FIRST VISIT

We’re always welcoming new patients to our family-oriented dental practice in Allen, TX. If this is your first visit with us, it won’t take long to see that we do things a little differently at our office. First and foremost, we get to know you—not just your medical history, but your past dental experiences, your reasons for coming to see us, and your goals for your smile. This time has been reserved especially for you. We want to ensure that you receive a thorough consultation and have plenty of time to ask our team any questions you may have.

NEW PATIENT FORMS

Once you schedule your first visit the forms will be emailed to you to be filled out online at home for your convenience. Simply hit Submit when you are done and the forms will be completed, only your signature will be required when you arrive at our for your reserved time.

POST OPERATIVE CARE

After Fillings

  • Your anesthesia will wear off in approximately 1 to 3 hours after the procedure. It is very important not to chew on the numb side (to prevent biting tongue, lip, etc.) until the anesthesia wears off.
  • Children should be observed until the anesthesia has worn off. Due to the strange feeling of the anesthetic, many children chew on the inside of their cheeks, lips and tongue which can cause serious damage.
  • Your tooth (or teeth) may be sensitive to hot, cold or pressure from this procedure. This is completely normal. The possible symptoms of hot, cold or pressure sensitivity will cease within a few days to a couple of weeks. In very few instances, this sensitivity could last longer than a couple of weeks. As long as your teeth or gums are continuing to feel better, (not staying the same, or getting worse) everything is fine, and there is no need for concern.
  • Once the anesthesia has worn off, if you feel as though any of the teeth we have worked on are hitting first when you bite down, please give our office a call immediately. This imbalance with your bite may cause further discomfort and should be adjusted.
  • The gum tissue could have been irritated during the procedure and may be sore for a few days. The anesthetic injection site may also feel sore or bruised.
  • With silver fillings, you should not chew hard foods or chew directly on the new fillings for the first 24 hours. If possible, chew only on the opposite side of your mouth. Composite (white) fillings set up right away and can be chewed on as soon as the anesthetic wears off.
  • If you have any other questions or concerns, please call our office.

After Dental Crowns

To prevent damage to a crown, there are a few things you can do:

  • Your anesthesia will wear off in approximately 1 to 3 hours after the procedure. It is very important not to chew on the numb side (to prevent biting tongue, lip, etc.) until the anesthesia wears off.
  • Children should be observed until the anesthesia has worn off. Due to the strange feeling of the anesthetic, many children chew on the inside of their cheeks, lips and tongue which can cause serious damage.
  • Your tooth (or teeth) may be sensitive to hot, cold or pressure from this procedure. This is completely normal. The possible symptoms of hot, cold or pressure sensitivity will cease within a few days to a couple of weeks. In very few instances, this sensitivity could last longer than a couple of weeks. As long as your teeth or gums are continuing to feel better, (not staying the same, or getting worse) everything is fine, and there is no need for concern.
  • Once the anesthesia has worn off, if you feel as though any of the teeth we have worked on are hitting first when you bite down, please give our office a call immediately. This imbalance with your bite may cause further discomfort and should be adjusted.
  • The gum tissue could have been irritated during the procedure and may be sore for a few days. The anesthetic injection site may also feel sore or bruised.
  • With silver fillings, you should not chew hard foods or chew directly on the new fillings for the first 24 hours. If possible, chew only on the opposite side of your mouth. Composite (white) fillings set up right away and can be chewed on as soon as the anesthetic wears off.
  • If you have any other questions or concerns, please call our office.

After Veneers

After you get veneers

  • Veneers can chip or break under pressure. Avoid biting your fingernails and chewing on hard objects, such as pencils or ice.
  • It may take you a few days to get used to the feel of your veneers. But do let your dentist know if your bite does not feel right after the veneer has been placed. He or she will correct it before you leave the office.
  • Keep your teeth and gums clean by brushing and flossing each day. You can still get cavities under or around veneers.

After Extraction

According to the American Dental Association:

A Few Simple Guidelines

Sometimes, teeth need to be removed due to decay, disease or trauma. Having a tooth removed or “pulled” is called a tooth extraction. When you have an extraction, it’s natural that changes will occur in your mouth afterward. Your dentist may give you instructions to follow after the extraction, and it’s important to talk to your dentist if you have any questions or problems. Here are some general guidelines to help promote healing, prevent complications, and make you more comfortable.

ANESTHETICS

Before the extraction, you will be given an anesthetic to reduce your discomfort. Your mouth will remain numb for a few hours after the extraction. While your mouth is numb, you’ll want to be careful not to bite your cheek, lip or tongue. After the extraction, do not eat any foods that require chewing while your mouth is numb. The numbness should go away within a few hours. If it doesn’t, contact your dentist.

BLEEDING

Your dentist may place a gauze pack on the extraction site to limit bleeding. This will also help a blood clot to form, which is necessary for normal healing. This gauze pack should be left in place for 30 to 45 minutes after you leave the dentist’s office. Do not chew on the pack. There may be some bleeding or oozing after the pack is removed. If so, here’s what to do:

  • Fold a piece of clean gauze into a pad thick enough to bite on. Dampen the pad with clean, warm water and place it directly on the extraction site.
  • Apply pressure by closing the teeth firmly over the pad. Maintain this pressure for about 30 minutes. If the pad becomes soaked with blood, replace it with a clean one.
  • Do not suck on the extraction site or disturb it with your tongue.
  • A slight amount of blood may leak from the extraction site until a clot forms. However, if heavy bleeding continues, call your dentist. (Remember, though, that a little bit of blood mixed with saliva can look like a lot of bleeding.)

DO NOT DISTURB!

The blood clot that forms in the tooth socket is an important part of the normal healing process. You should avoid doing things that might disturb the clot. Here’s how to protect it:

  • Do not rinse your mouth vigorously, or drink through a straw for 24 hours. These activities create suction in the mouth, which could loosen the clot and delay healing.
  • Avoid alcoholic beverages or mouthwash containing alcohol for 24 hours.
  • If you are a smoker, talk to your dentist before the surgery on ways to quit. You should not smoke after surgery.
  • Limit strenuous activity for 24 hours after the extraction. This will reduce bleeding and help the blood clot to form.
  • Sometimes the blood clot does not form in the first day or two after the extraction, or it forms but breaks down. The result is called dry socket. This can be very painful and should be reported to your dentist. A dressing may be placed in the socket to protect it until the socket heals and to reduce any pain.

CLEANING YOUR MOUTH

Do not clean the teeth next to the healing tooth socket for the rest of the day. You should, however, brush and floss your other teeth well and begin cleaning the teeth next to the healing tooth socket the next day. You can also brush your tongue. This will help get rid of the bad breath and unpleasant taste that are common after an extraction.

The day after the extraction, gently rinse your mouth with warm salt water (half a teaspoon salt in an 8 oz. glass of warm water) after meals to keep food particles out of the extraction site. Try not to rinse your mouth vigorously, as this may loosen the blood clot. If you have hypertension, discuss with your dentist whether you should rinse with salt water. Avoid using a mouthwash during this early healing period unless your dentist advises you to do so.

MEDICATION

If your dentist has prescribed medicine to control pain and inflammation, or to prevent infection, use it only as directed. If the pain medication prescribed does not seem to work for you, do not take more pills or take them more often than directed—call your dentist.

SWELLING AND PAIN

After a tooth is removed, you may have some discomfort and notice some swelling. This is normal. To help reduce swelling and pain, try applying an ice bag or cold, moist cloth to your face.